Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

Remember Your Ancestors and Buy in Bulk to Avoid Bulk

  This part two of a multi-part series started here. Unless hunters and gatherers hunted or gathered it, we are not designed to digest it and it will create a clog. If anything other than cooking or blending is required between the plant or animal and your stomach, then it does not belong in your […]

Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

A Rallying Cry for Wellness Influencers

Re-posted from http://www.metaboliceffect.com/a-rallying-cry-for-wellness-influencers

Over the last year I met and became pretty tight with Jonathan Bailor. You may have seen us here at Metabolic Effect recommend his book The Smarter Science of Slim. Jonathan and I get together on occasion and talk shop about research, clinical practice and the state of the health and fitness industry.

One of the things that has always confused both of us is the sometimes ridiculous nature of the health and fitness industry. There is often so much bickering back and forth. “Fat is the cause of disease!” “No, its not its carbohydrates!!” “Meat will kill you!” “My science is better than your science!” “My health guru said that’s not true, so your an idiot!” And on it goes.

Atkins, Paleo, Vegan, Vegetarian, Primal, Fasting etc. The arguments, confusion and frustration rage on and on. It is becoming a bit tiresome. If you realize humans crave certainty above all else, you can understand a little about this behavior. If you do something different, it can challenge what another person thinks they know and that often leads to the ridiculous side of human behavior and the desire to form teams and attack.

At Metabolic Effect the only team we are on is yours. And Jonathan feels the same way. Ultimately there is far more to agree on than there is to bicker about. Here is a message from Jonathan. I hope you will read and take it to heart.

Jade Teta

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES

The worldwide rate of obesity has more than doubled since 1980. There are now about as many overweight people alive as there were *total* people alive a century ago. The rate of diabetes and pre-diabetes has increased 100,000% in one century. More than 40 million children under the age of five are overweight.

This is ridiculous. And this is what we’re up against.

We’re not in a battle against one another. Nobody working to help others eat more real food is our adversary. We’re here to save lives, not to be right. It is a waste of our valuable time to argue with anyone who agrees that starvation is counterproductive.

So what may we be best served spending our time on? Three suggestions:

  1. Celebrating our similarities rather than demonizing our differences.
  2. Ignoring those who tear others down so we may maximize our time spent helping individuals who are calorie counting their way into and early grave.
  3. Serving the 99% who remain trapped by mainstream calorie mythology rather than focusing on the 1% who have already been freed by real food.

And if we must go negative, let us focus our efforts on those who remain nameless and faceless; those corporations hell-bent on stuffing children with processed sweets, refined starches, and industrial fats, while working to convince adults that starvation is healthy. Those who profit off of others pain are the adversary; not those who genuinely seek to improve health and wellness—albeit through slightly different means.

Together we can turn the tides against the worst health crisis the modern world has ever seen. And we must. It is literally a matter of life and death.

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

Science Sound Bite: SANE Solutions to Cravings

Frequently Asked Question

How can I curb my cravings for sweet, salty, or crunchy snacks?

Answer

Sweet

  • Protein bars with at least four times more protein than sugar (I enjoy Quest bars)
  • Berries and citrus
  • Diabetic candy/chocolate
  • Low-carb snack products
  • SANE fudge
  • Sugar-free drinks such as Crystal Light etc.
Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES

Salty

You can use as much salt as you’d like in food (within reason). This should go along way in avoiding cravings in the first place.

  • Beef or turkey jerky
  • Lunch meat
  • Soy nuts
  • Nuts

Crunchy

  • Raw sugar snap peas
  • Raw celery
  • Soy nuts
  • Nuts
  • Low-carb snack products
Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

SANE Eating on Anticoagulant Medications: Keep A Steady Course!

pillsandbottle

by Catherine Britell, M.D.

 

One sunny summer afternoon about 15 years ago, my husband and I were enjoying a double kayak paddle in Seattle’s Lake Union, looking at the houseboats and ducks and conjecturing about the “Sleepless in Seattle” lifestyle, when he suddenly said, “Cathy, you need to paddle us back to the rental place now.”   So, I did, and then he said, “Now you need to drive us to the hospital.  I’m not feeling well”.  And the next day, he had a brand new plastic heart valve to replace the congenitally malformed one that had suddenly started malfunctioning.

In order to prevent formation of blood clots on the artificial valve, it’s necessary for him to take a warfarin anticoagulant.   Others need to take anticoagulant medications for other reasons.    The dose of this medication needs to be carefully adjusted according to regular blood tests.

Why is this relevant to SANE eating?   It’s important because blood clots are formed through a series of chemical reactions in your body, and Vitamin K is necessary for many of those reactions. Warfarin (brand name: Coumadin) works by decreasing the activity of Vitamin K; lengthening the time it takes for a clot to form. And Vitamin K is found in very high to moderate amounts in many of the non-starchy vegetables that are the mainstay of SANE eating.  For us, it means that we pay attention to the Vitamin K in our foods, and for my husband, a slightly larger daily dose of anticoagulant medication.

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES

The International Normalized Ratio (INR) and the Prothrombin Time (PT) are determined by the time it takes blood to clot.  Individuals at risk for developing blood clots take warfarin to lengthen the usual time it takes for a clot to form, resulting in a prolonged INR/PT. Doctors usually measure the INR/PT every month in patients taking warfarin to make sure it stays in the desired range.

So, if you’re taking warfarin anticoagulants, it’s important to keep your vitamin K intake as constant as possible. Sudden increases in vitamin K intake may decrease the effect of the medication, while lowering your vitamin K intake could increase the effect of warfarin.  It’s important, then, to keep your intake of foods rich in vitamin K about the same each day. For example, you may plan to eat only ½ cup of these foods per day. If you like these foods and eat them often, you can eat more, but be consistent.   Some people find that VERY large quantities of high Vitamin K vegetables may make it difficult to achieve and maintain therapeutic anticoagulation and so may wish to go easy on kale, spinach, and collard greens.

If you are taking warfarin anticoagulants it’s vital that you know the vitamin K levels in various non-starchy vegetables, so that you can maintain the desired consistency in intake.   Here’s a list of foods highest in Vitamin K.

 

Food Serving Size and Vitamin K levels (micrograms) 

 

  • Kale, cooked 1/2 cup — 531
  • Spinach, cooked 1/2 cup — 444
  • Collards, cooked 1/2 cup — 418
  • Swiss chard, raw 1 cup  — 299
  • Swiss chard, cooked 1/2 cup  — 287
  • Mustard greens, raw 1 cup — 279
  • Turnip greens, cooked 1/2 cup — 265
  • Parsley, raw 1/4 cup — 246
  • Broccoli, cooked 1 cup — 220
  • Brussels sprouts, cooked 1 cup — 219
  • Mustard greens, cooked 1/2 cup — 210
  • Collards, raw 1 cup — 184
  • Spinach, raw 1 cup — 145
  • Turnip greens, raw 1 cup — 138
  • Endive, raw 1 cup — 116
  • Broccoli, raw 1 cup — 89
  • Cabbage, cooked 1/2 cup — 82
  • Green leaf lettuce 1 cup — 71
  • Prunes, stewed 1 cup — 65
  • Romaine lettuce, raw 1 cup — 57
  • Asparagus 4 spears — 48
  • Avocado 1 cup (cube, slice, puree) — 30-48
  • Tuna, canned in oil 3 ounces — 37
  • Blue/black-berries, raw 1 cup — 29
  • Peas, cooked 1/2 cup — 21

The bottom line:  If you’re taking anticoagulant medications, eating a SANE diet with abundant non-starchy vegetables will be wonderful and healthy for you.  However, when you embark upon your SANE lifestyle, even when you are choosing low or moderate Vitamin K vegetables, you can expect your warfarin dose to increase, just because of the number of servings of vegetables you are now eating.   And you’ll probably need to have more frequent blood tests for awhile.  So, it’s important to

  • let your doctor know that you’re eating significantly more vegetables
  • follow his/her instructions as regards monitoring and warfarin dosage
  • keep your Vitamin K intake moderate and steady.  
Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES

 

Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

Science Sound Bite: The China Study

Quite a few people have asked what I think about The China Study. Some quick thoughts:

The research I reviewed over the past decade shows that plant foods such as non-starchy vegetables, citrus fruits, berries, nuts, and seeds, should make up the majority of the food we eat. I’d imagine Dr. Cambell (the author of the book about The China Study) would support this. The research I reviewed also showed that the statements “animal foods are unhealthy” and “plant foods are healthy” have been disproven. Myriad studies show that animal foods such as fish are some of the healthiest foods around. Myriad studies also show that the plant foods sugar and starch are unhealthy.

Science shows that our diet should consist of SANE foods. SANE foods can come from plants or animals.

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES

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Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

Jonathan Bailor: The Backstory, From His Doctor

 

My long-time physician was kind enough to provide some 3rd party context around me and SANE. I thought a personal and medical look at the backstory behind the research and experience that resulted in SANESolution would be useful (or entertaining 🙂 ). – Jonathan

By Dr. Scott Ripple, Family Practice physician

During my 20+ year medical career I have treated thousands of patients ranging from individuals carrying more than 200 lbs. of excess body fat to professional bodybuilders with 2% body fat. It was clear from my first appointment with Jonathan nearly a decade ago that he had a unique approach to health and fitness.

When we first met, Jonathan was an experienced personal trainer and had educated himself extensively on traditional approaches to health and fitness. Almost obsessive in his implementation of typical diet and exercise approaches and spending around 20 hours per week on this effort, Jonathan achieved good results. In fact, I mentioned to him that I thought he could do quite well in an amateur bodybuilding competition without any further preparation. This suggestion generated little interest as Jonathan was more interested in focusing on ways to make health and fitness more practical so that he could focus his attention on other goals in his life.

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES

A few years into the scholarly research that would later become SANE, Jonathan became further dissatisfied with the impracticality of hours of weekly exercise and the discomfort and bloating accompanying the traditional starch-based diet he was consuming. He eventually reached a plateau and began to see diminishing returns from all his time and effort. Then came the setbacks: shoulder pains, a hamstring injury, and finally a torn pectoralis muscle in his chest.

Feeling burned out after 10+ years of following the traditional “eat less, exercise more” approach, he made a full-stop switch to the eating and exercise practices now filling the pages of SANE.  I was surprised to see the effects during his recent visit. His waist shrunk by three inches, he is significantly more toned and defined, his strength, energy, and endurance are better than ever, and he is free of injuries. Even more surprising was that this resulted from exercising once per week and following simple nutrition principles rooted in even intake of protein, carbohydrate, and fat from natural foods.  With fasting glucose (an indicator of propensity for diabetes) and cholesterol (an indicator of propensity for heart issues) at levels that are extremely healthy and a physique on par with some famous fitness professionals (and superior to that achieved by his 20-hours-per-week traditional routine years prior), it seems unarguable that Jonathan achieved his goal of discovering a more practical approach to sustainable fat loss and wellness.

As a doctor, I know that people frequently go out of their way to avoid the topic of health and fitness. It is likely that you have tried to change your eating and exercise habits before and not seen the results you hoped for. It is natural to feel guilt and anxiety after such an experience. I hope that the research, medical support, and experience Jonathan brings to SANE living will alleviate your doubts and allow you to be inspired.

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

Is Jonathan Bailor Lipophobic?

 

Also enjoy this segment from the Balanced Bites podcast

I recently had the pleasure of talking with Jimmy Moore and his listeners on Jimmy’s “Ask the Low-Carb Experts Show.” Wanted to share the show here as well as some commentary that took place afterwards. Thanks for the great show Jimmy!

Comment 1

Did anyone notice the contradiction in what Jonathan said? His ‘SANE’ system suggests that vegetables and protein are the most satiating of foods; but he said to Jimmy that there’s nothing more satiating than fat, admitting that he never feels quite satiated without it! Umm, Jonathan, what about all that water and fibre that you claimed would sate you?

So, why does he constantly de-emphasise fat? Well, he still *does* have a remnant of fat phobia. It’s not the Ancel Keys full-blown variety (“don’t eat fat or you’re gonna die!”) but a more subtle version of it, where fat is treated with careful suspicion. Notice how many times Jonathan referred to how easy it is to “overeat” fats. Has anyone noticed a huge contradiction in his statements? Firstly, he says “you don’t need to count calories; calories-in/calories-out is falacious”. Then he says “Fats have so many calories you need to be careful not to eat too much of it” (ie: you need to count your calories!)

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES

As Jimmy and so many others have found out: there is NOTHING as satiating and as metabolically-regulating as dietary-fat.

Finally, I was pulling my hair out when he talked about getting low-fat, processed Greek Yoghurt instead of the natural, full-fat variety, and then *adding* additional processed fats to it! And then recommending egg-white omelettes! This is not the language of someone who believes in genuine whole-food, sane eating, but of an obsessive who’s just doing calorie-counting through the back door, who works hard to tailor his plan so that it offends the sensibilities of conventional wisdom as little as possible.

Comment 2

Jimmy,
I’m very glad that some of your questioners called Bailor out on the low-fat nonsense that pervades his book. It’s amazing that he pretends that the diet recommendations in his book have anything to do with either low carb or paleo – most of them are based on completely conventional dietary advice (egg whites, etc.) which is how he managed to get so many endorsements from the mainstream medical community. In your podcast he comes over just like a politician saying whatever he thinks his audience wants to hear, but if you read his book the diet he actually advocates is 33% carbohydrate and 33% protein. His emphasis on whey protein, egg whites, fat-free yogurt and cottage cheese is really problematic.

My Reply

Thank you for your feedback.

As I mentioned on the podcast I think all of our time is much better served celebrating our similarities rather than attacking our differences. I’m really glad to hear that low-carb/high-fat is working for you and hope that you would acknowledge that science and billions of people have shown that it is possible to be quite healthy and slim while getting less than 60% of one’s calories from fat. I think our shared effort of getting the mainstream to consume less carbohydrate would be furthered if we avoided perpetuating the very dietary prejudice (aka prejudging a way of eating based on one characteristic that differs from our own way of eating) that frustrates us so much (aka when many mainstream “experts” dismiss a well formulated low-carb/high-fat diet as unhealthy based on their fat content and lack of healthy whole grains).

To briefly note some of the “contradictions:”

  • We don’t need to count calories when we eat SANEly. That doesn’t mean calories don’t count. If we metabolize more calories than our body can eliminate, we will gain fat. Calories count. However, that can’t mean that humans have to count calories to be healthy and fit considering that the concept of a calorie didn’t even exist in until 1824…while humans were healthy and fit long before then.
  • You may note from The Smarter Science of Slim text and from the podcast that I explicitly say it’s not a low-carb/high-fat diet. This doesn’t mean I’m against low-carb/high-fat, it’s just that it’s not what I’m writing about nor have I ever claimed it is. With this in mind, I hope it doesn’t come as a surprise that what I recommend isn’t 100% in line with the low-carb/high-fat way of eating.
  • While fat is satiating (as I mentioned in the podcast), water, protein, and fiber also play critical roles. http://thesmarterscienceofslim… & http://thesmarterscienceofslim….
  • For those of us who are struggling with fat loss, it may not be necessary for all of us to go out of our way to eat more fat, as our body can always eat more fat from the stores we’re carrying around with us.
  • I hope we don’t stereotype anyone who thinks people can be healthy and slim while getting less than 60% of their calories from fat as fat phobic as doing so risks alienating a lot of brilliant researchers, many of whom we may otherwise really enjoy (ex. Cordain, Eaton, Konner, Kresser, Guyenet, etc.).

Sorry I haven’t provided a more detailed reply here. I’ve referenced the research supporting my recommendations extensively in my book, think a well formulated low-carb/high-fat diet is wonderful for many, and am delighted that you have found a way of eating that works for you. Here’s to working together to help others enjoy the health benefits of a grain-free, sugar-free, and seed-oil free lifestyle rather than tearing each other down for not recommending a one size fits all diet. – Jonathan Bailor

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

Forks Over Knives and The China Study’s T. Colin Campell Chats with Jonathan Bailor

T. Colin Campell (from Forks Over Knives and The China Study) and I recently had a conversation on a public Amazon discussion board. Our chat started a bit rocky, but then became quite useful.

Context

The research supporting SANE was brought up by a reader on the aforementioned discussion board. T. Colin Campell then wrote (http://amzn.to/JtSwt5): “But fortunately, science will prevail over ad hominem attacks.” When this was brought to my attention I was quite startled as thousands of pages of peer-reviewed academic research do not agree with Campell’s recommended “low-protein, low-fat” and therefore unnaturally high-carbohydrate diet. To ensure that a diverse set of research was represented within the discussion, I shared a set of studies showing that natural fats are not harmful (http://amzn.to/K3EHoj) along with the short editorial: “You were right. Science prevailed.”

The Discussion

Note: If you visit the discussion board, you will see that many others contributed to this conversation. I’ve included only my chat with Campell here as I’m frequently asked what I think about Forks Over Knives and The China Study and this provides a useful answer.

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES

Campell’s reply (http://amzn.to/KsXFlW):

I previously said, “…science will prevail”. I said what I mean and mean what I said. But this can have meaning, I suspect, if only the would-be scientists and their minions in this discussion group would agree to really learn some science.

John Bailor’s post is a beautiful illustration of the problem. He certainly is clever in creating a list of studies, some quite well known, supporting the hypothesis that it is not total fat that has caused our high rates of heart disease, obesity and related ailments.

I agree that these studies, mostly all published in the peer-reviewed research literature, certainly support this hypothesis. Moreover, I not only support this hypothesis but said so, publicly, BEFORE any of these studies were conducted!!!!!!!

I suspect that this comment of mine may be surprising for those of you who post so many silly `storeys’ in this discussion group. I believe that this is because these individuals do not understand science, have not been trained in the field of nutrition and/or have inadequate access to the literature.

I personally know several of the investigators involved in these studies and spoke about their shortcomings on the dietary fat question even before they were organized. I lectured three times at Harvard when the Nurses’ Health Study was initially being organized and once at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center who organized the mammoth Women’s Health Initiative, each time offering that it would be a shortcoming to investigate the role of total fat in the etiology of these diseases with the cohorts and the protocols that they were using (all the other studies cited by Bailor also had the same shortcoming).

Namely, I have always been unwilling to assume that single nutrient adjustments in an exceedingly complex nutrient diet would show much of anything. It is unlikely to see a meaningful single nutrient effect within such complexity because of the interacting and compensatory effects of countless-and co-linear-nutrients (e.g., of fat) having similar disease producing effects. Even more importantly, in these studies cited by Bailor, these countless other factors will have already `maxed out’ their deleterious effects. Removing or decreasing one dietary item, e.g., total fat, has very little, if any, chance of working. This is similar to the use of nutrient supplements that we now know do not work, and in some studies actually do the opposite of what wa intended.

In short, in ALL these studies, trivial changes are being studied. This is NOT the way that nutrition works. For example, in NONE of these studies, were their subjects consuming a truly low fat, low protein, whole food, plant-based diet (never mind the superficial and really stupid characterization of `low fat’ as being something like 25-30% of total calories-read again my commentary on this book). This is where truly large and sustaining effects are observed.

As far as I am concerned, the evidence now available for a low fat, low protein whole food, plant-based diet is irrefutable. What these studies listed by Bailor prove-and this is the best of science!-is that adjustment of fat alone in Western type diets will have little or no effect. I have spent far too long (more than a half century) doing the experimental research, publishing the results in peer-reviewed literature, and helping to develop national food and health policy to believe otherwise. It simply works when people do it the right way. This is the future history!

 

My reply (http://amzn.to/IurkjH):

T. Colin Campbell says: “I have always been unwilling to assume that single nutrient adjustments in an exceedingly complex nutrient diet would show much of anything.”

Well stated. I appreciate all of your work in this field and your focus on whole foods. My research 100% agrees that eating dramatically more non-starchy vegetables, more nutrient dense fruits (ex. berries and citrus), and more nuts and seed is critical to health and fitness. You are 100% correct that eating a lot more of the *right* plants is critical to long-term health and fitness. Great work and thank you.

Given that you are “unwilling to assume that single nutrient adjustments in an exceedingly complex nutrient diet would show much of anything,” why the recommendation to adjust the single nutrients protein and fat down? Data unquestionably show there are healthy and unhealthy plants as well as healthy and unhealthy non-plants. Sugar is a plant. Wild caught salmon is not. The evidence now available irrefutably states that given the choice between sugar and salmon that the plant is preferable. Tombs of research, including your work in China, suggest that the consumption of seafood (a non-plant) dramatically improves health.

Why not find the best plants and best animals and focus on consuming those rather than making polarizing statements along the lines of plants are good and non-plants are bad? As you state so well, the answer in this exceedingly complex area is more nuanced than that.

The broader research community 100% agrees that consuming more non-starchy vegetables, more nutrient dense fruits (ex. berries and citrus), and more nuts and seed is critical to health and fitness, so why not focus on that rather than making scientifically-unsupported statements against the consumption of healthy non-plants such as seafood? The data is equally clear for those foodstuffs.

Thank you for dedicating your life to making the world a healthier and happier place. We share that goal.

– Jonathan Bailor

 

Campell’s reply (http://amzn.to/II0PXG):

Jonathan Bailor says:

Given that you are “unwilling to assume that single nutrient adjustments in an exceedingly complex nutrient diet would show much of anything,” why the recommendation to adjust the single nutrients protein and fat down?

When I did the experimental research on protein and fat (mostly protein), I was doing it in a way that was generally accepted (i.e., nutrient by nutrient)–keep also in mind that this is the way that we got funding from NIH to do research because this the way that we think. As I got into this research during a 27-year project doing hundreds of studies, I found the responses to be so provocative, almost unbelievable (both because of my personal and professional backgrounds). Gradually I was accumulating a series of what were regarded as heresies, at least for me.

It was then that I started asking about the properties of other nutrients, other disease endpoints and, most importantly, other explanatory mechanisms, as well as becoming concerned about the relevance of this information for humans instead of experimental animals. This is when I began 1) to realize and to demonstrate that nutrient compositions characteristic of WHOLE plants aggregated together, both in kind and in amount, had what clearly was the centuries old idea, “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts”. It then became more of a question how and whether the effects seen individually could be accommodated within a whole diet framework.

There’s far more to this story that will be published in a new book that I am just now completing, “Whole”, due in January 2013.

By the way, sugar is not a plant, it is a fragment of a plant and, as such, it behaves very differently (in size and kind of effect). Yes, salmon is a whole food but it does not accommodate information showing in a rabbit experiment that its protein increases serum cholesterol more than any plant protein source. Also, salmon has very small amounts of the large group of antioxidants and none of the complex carbohydrates, both of which are the core of the benefits of whole plants.

When I draw generalizations between plants and animals, I do so partly on the totality of the evidence on nutrient composition, partly on the biological plausibility of the evidence and partly on the results that are obtained in human trials–and more.

 

My reply (http://amzn.to/JFnbYN):

T. Colin Campbell – The explanation of your focus on protein makes sense. Hopefully it also makes sense that your statement “I have always been unwilling to assume that single nutrient adjustments in an exceedingly complex nutrient diet would show much of anything,” and similar sentiment provided in your popular text, are contradictory with your message to essentially avoid protein, as doing so is a single nutrient adjustment.

I am aware that sugar is not a plant 🙂 I hope my point was clear and reasonable. Tobacco is a plant, and I suspect that you would not recommend eating large quantities of it. If anything other than the importance of water consumption is close to unanimously agreed upon in the broader nutrition research community, it must be that there are healthy and unhealthy plants as well as healthy and unhealthy non-plants.

You are a very influential man and if I may be so bold, I would urge you to use that influence to encourage people to consume whole foods that help us avoid overeating (have high satiety), do not have a detrimental impact our blood sugar or hormones, provide an abundance of nutrients etc. per calorie, and do not promote the storage of excess fat, rather than trivializing what you rightly call an “exceedingly complex area” by suggesting that all plants are good and all non-plants are bad. I realize that some of the correlations found in your research may not agree, but I do hope you acknowledge that there are tombs of research from highly respected institutions demonstrating the health benefits of non-plants fitting the criteria I outlined above.

Best of luck with your upcoming work and I do hope that our paths cross in the future.

– Jonathan Bailor

 

Campbell concluded our discussion with (http://tinyurl.com/6pqecxj):

Jonathan,

I must emphasize the rationale for doing the research the way we did, not only because it was opportunistic and potentially rewarding but also, because of the funding, we focused on protein as researchers did and still do with focused hypotheses and study designs. As time passed, the very provocative findings with protein prompted me to go further to see the extent to which similar phenomena existed with other nutrients. This is where w discovered lots of interesting things that pointed to the benefits of a whole, plant-based foods diet. I then suggested that the “closer we get to a whole foods plant-based diet the greater the health benefits.” Ever since, I have pointed out that I do not know of scientific evidence showing that going 100% the whole way is better than, say 95% or so. Therefore, I have never said that 100% plant based is a proven scientific fact and that every last drop or crumble of the difficult foods need to be excluded. This is what others have said about my findings. However, I also have said many times that 100% nonetheless is, for me, advisable because it allows our taste preferences to adjust and within 1-3 months, sufficiently adjusted to a point where we do not want to return to our old ways. It is analogous to telling heavy smokers to stop smoking but letting them have a cigarette or two a day. It really doesn’t work because of the tenacity with which old preferences keep us hooked. On this point, I believe people have told more than a few times that I am some sort of inflexible activist.

 

I hope this was useful or at least interesting 🙂

I covered The China Study briefly a few months back and a quick web search will provide much more thorough China Study commentary if you’d like to read more.

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

SANE Peanut Butter Pie. Go Ahead. Eat Dessert First.

Many members of SANE Community have shared all sorts of delicious ways to enjoy plain Greek yogurt. One way that I recently discovered involves using plain Greek yogurt to make what tastes like the filling of a peanut butter pie. The neat thing is that while this mixture can be put into a SANE pie crust, if you enjoy it right out of the bowl, it’s 44% protein, 42% healthy fats, and 14% carbohydrate. To put that in perspective, eggs are 29% protein, tofu is 37% protein, and salmon is 48% protein. That peanut butter pie sounds more like a SANE meal than a dessert.

Of course it’s not going to be as good as actual peanut butter pie filling, but getting as close as this gets while staying SANE makes me happy 🙂

Topping

  • Non-fat plain Greek yogurt + non-caloric sweetener of your choice
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Filling

  • 2 cups non-fat plain Greek yogurt
  • ½ cup + a tablespoon of natural peanut butter
  • What would be equivalent to approximately 2 tablespoons of sugar worth of the non-caloric sweetener of your choice (start with less and add more according to your desired level of sweetness)
  • 3 scoops vanilla whey protein isolate
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

 

Crust

  • Grain-Free Honey Graham Cracker Pie Crust I recommend leaving out the honey

Enjoy!

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

Science Sound Bite: NYTimes’ “Fat Trap,” Tara Parker-Pope, and Unclogging Sinks

 

Update: Let’s repurpose this post to speak to Tara Parker-Pope’s recent NYTimes post “The Fat Trap” regarding the futility of traditional fat loss methods.

Parker-Pope is exactly right that studies show eating less of the typical diet and doing more of traditional exercise does not work for the vast majority of people. However, that does not mean we need to be “trapped” by body fat. Myriad studies show that by changing the quality of one’s diet and the quality of one’s exercise (vs. quantity of eating and exercise) long-term fat loss is not only possible, but practical.

Think about trying to burn body fat after years of the traditional American diet like trying to drain water from a clogged sink. Eating less of the same quality of food is like turning down the faucet. Doing more of the same quality of exercise is like scooping out the overflowing water with a teaspoon. Both are temporary ways to deal with the symptoms of the problem (too much water in, not enough water out). Neither does anything about the root cause (a clog blocking the sink’s natural ability to automatically balance “water in” with “water out”). That is why studies show eating less and exercising more failing long term 95% of the time.

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES

The problem is the clog. The solution is clearing the clog. And clearing the clog requires thinking in terms of food and exercise quality, not quantity.

Reducing the quantity of food which lead to the clog and increasing the quantity of exercise which ignores the clog doesn’t really help us. That simply reduces the symptoms associated with the underlying clog. We remove clogs–and “drain” body fat long term–by putting the right quality in, and keeping the wrong quality out.

It’s not about less in and more out. It’s about higher quality in and higher quality out.

The only “fat trap” is being unable or unwilling to escape quantity-based fat loss theories which have been proven wrong.

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES