Seaweed

NEWS: This superfood is now available in the SANEStore as a convenient whole-food powder so you can more easily enjoy it in smoothies and recipes.

Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com
Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES

Our raw organic Bladderwrack comes from the pristine and protected oceans of the North Atlantic. Whole leaves of organic bladderwrack are sun-dried and then ground into a powder at low temperatures.

Raw Bladderwrack seaweed is a rich source of mucilage, algin, mannitol, beta-carotene, zeaxanthin, iodine, bromine, potassium as well as volatile oils. In addition, bladderwrack extract may have health benefits on a variety of conditions including those of the skin. Organic raw Bladderwrack powder like other sea vegetables is virtually fat-free, low calorie and one of the richest sources of minerals in the vegetable kingdom. Bladderwrack seaweed contains high amounts of calcium and phosphorous and is extremely high in magnesium, iron, iodine and sodium. This amazing sea vegetable is also a source of fucoidan, a polysaccharidic known to scavenge heavy metals and radioisotopes throughout the body.

Raw organic bladderwrack seaweed (Fucus Vesiculosus) is a brown seaweed and a great natural source of Iodine / Potassium iodide (KI). Iodine is a chemical element essential for the production of thyroid hormones that regulate growth and metabolism. Diets deficient in iodine may increase risk of retarded brain development in children (cretinism), mental slowness, high cholesterol, lethargy, fatigue, depression, weight gain, and goiter: a swelling of the thyroid gland in the neck. The natural Potassium iodide (KI) / Iodine from bladderwrack is absorbed by your body more slowly and safely than chemical or synthetic iodine. Further bladderwrack may helps promote an alkaline pH balance within the body and also boosts the immune system possibly due to its naturally high organic mineral content.

Iodine / Potassium iodide (KI), administered orally immediately after exposure to certain types of radiation, may be used to protect the thyroid from ingested radioactive iodine. But Potassium iodide (KI) would only be effective if the radiation contains radioactive iodine.

Raw Bladderwrack extract may also be excellent for heavy metal detoxification. It is a primary source of the polysaccharide known as alginic acid. Scientific researchers, including a team led by Dr. Tanaka at McGill University, have demonstrated that alginic acid binds with any heavy metals found in the intestines, renders them indigestible, and causes them to be eliminated. Heavy metals such as barium, cadmium, lead, mercury, zinc, and even radioactive strontium, that may be present in the intestines will not be absorbed by the body when alginic acid is present. What’s more, Dr. Tanaka’s research has shown that the alginic acid in sea vegetables actually helps bind and draw out any similar toxins that are already stored in our bodies, thus “lowering the body’s burden.”

Doctors Seibin and Teruko Arasaki, Japanese scientists who have published several books about sea vegetables, also report this cleansing property of alginic acid in their book Vegetables From the Sea. They conclude, “Heavy metals taken into the human body are rendered insoluble by alginic acid in the intestines and cannot, therefore, be absorbed into body tissues.”

Alginic acid swells upon contact with water; when taken orally, it forms a type of “seal” at the top of the stomach, and for this reason is used in several over-the-counter preparations for heartburn. The same constituent gives bladder wrack laxative properties as well Other proposed uses of bladder wrack include treating atherosclerosis and strengthening immunity, although there is no scientific evidence at present that it works for these purposes.

Sound Promising?

Want to Try Adding a Convenient and Pure Powdered Form of This Whole Food to Your Smoothies and Recipes?

Why Try?

  • Ability to scavenge chemicals, drugs, heavy metals & radioisotopes throughout the body
  • Anti-aging properties
  • May strengthen immunity
  • Great natural source of Iodine / Potassium iodide (KI)
  • Strengthens an underactive thyroid
  • May fight heartburn
  • May be helpful for inflamed joints when used internally or externally
  • Helpful for women who have excessive estrogen secretion or predisposed to estrogen sensitive conditions
  • Excellent source of bioavailable iron
  • May improve cholesterol
  • Antiviral, anticoagulant, & antithrombotic properties
  • Contains fucoidans which may have anti-inflammatory benefits
  • Natural source of the mineral vanadium which appears to play a multi-faceted role in regulation of carbohydrate metabolism & blood sugar
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

References

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3. Björvell H, Rössner S. Long-term effects of commonly available weight reducing programmes in Sweden. Int J Obes 1986;11:67–71.

4. Kocharatana P, et al. Clinical trial of maeng-lak seeds used as a bulk laxative. Maharaj Nakornratchasima Hosp Med Bull 1985;9:120–36.

5. Muangman V, Siripraiwan S, Ratanaolarn K, et al. A clinical trial of Ocimum canum Sims seeds as a bulk laxative in elderly post-operative patients. Ramathibodi Med J 1985;8:154–8.

6. Eherer AH, Porter J, Fordtran JS. Effect of psyllium, calcium polycarbophil, and wheat bran on secretory diarrhea induced by phenolphthalein. Gastroenterol 1993;104:1007–12.

7. Golan R. Optimal Wellness. New York: Ballantine Books, 1995, 373–4.

8. Chevrel B. A comparative crossover study on the treatment of heartburn and epigastric pain: Liquid Gaviscon and a magnesium-aluminum antacid gel. J Int Med Res 1980;8:300–3.

9. Norman JA, Pickford CJ, Sanders TW, et al. Human intake of arsenic and iodine from seaweed based food supplements and health foods available in the UK. Food Add Contam 1987;5:103–9.

10. Barnett SA, Varley SJ. The effects of calcium alginate on wound healing. Ann R Coll Surgeons Engl 1987;69:153–5.

11. Norman JA, Pickford CJ, Sanders TW, et al. Human intake of arsenic and iodine from seaweed based food supplements and health foods available in the UK. Food Addit Contam 1987;5:103–9.

12. Chevrel B. A comparative crossover study on the treatment of heartburn and epigastric pain: Liquid Gaviscon and a magnesium-aluminum antacid gel. J Int Med Res 1980;8:300–3.

13. Barnett SA, Varley SJ. The effects of calcium alginate on wound healing. Ann R Coll Surgeons Engl 1987;69:153–5.

14. Béress A, Wassermann O, Bruhn T, et al. A new procedure for the isolation of anti-HIV compounds (polysaccharides and polyphenols) from the marine alga Fucus vesiculosus. J Nat Prod 1993;56:478–88.

15. Vázquez-Freire MJ, Lamela M, Calleja JM. Hypolipidaemic activity of a polysaccharide extract from Fucus vesiculosus L. Phytother Res 1996;10:647–50.

16. Lahaye M, Kaeffer B. Seaweed dietary fibres: Structure, physico-chemical and biological properties relevant to intestinal physiology. Sci Aliments 1997;17:564–84 [review].

17. Vázquez-Freire MJ, Lamela M, Calleja JM. Hypolipidaemic activity of a polysaccharide extract from Fucus vesiculosus L. Phytother Res 1996;10:647–50.

18. Vázquez-Freire MJ, Lamela M, Calleja JM. A preliminary study of hypoglycaemic activity of several polysaccharide extracts from brown algae: Fucus vesiculosus, Saccorhiza polyschides and Laminaria ochroleuca. Phytother Res 1996;10(suppl):S184–5.

19. Bartlett MR, Warren HS, Cowden WB, Parish DR. Effects of the anti-inflammatory compounds castanospermine, mannose-6-phosphate and fucoidan on allograft rejection and elicited peritoneal exudates. Immunol Cell Biol 1994;72:367–74.

20. Church FC, Mead JB, Treanor RE, Whinna HC. Antithrombin activity of fucoidan. The interaction of fucoidan with heparin cofactor II, antithrombin III and thrombin. J Biol Chem 1989;264:3618–23.

21. Criado MT, Ferreirós CM. Toxicity of an algal mucopolysaacharide for Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis strains. Rev Esp Fisiol 1984;40:227–30.

22. Moen LK, Clark GF. A novel reverse transcriptase inhibitor from Fucus vesiculosus. Int Conf AIDS 1993;9(1):145, abstr. #PO-A03–0061.

23. Criado MT, Ferreirós CM. Toxicity of an algal mucopolysaacharide for Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis strains. Rev Esp Fisiol 1984;40:227–30.

24. Lederman S, Gulick R, Chess L. Dextran sulfate and heparin interact with CD4 molecules to inhibit the binding of coat protein (gp120) of HIV. J Immunol 1989;143:1149–54.

25. Mills SY. Out of the Earth: The Essential Book of Herbal Medicine. Middlesex, UK: Viking Arkana, 1991:514–6.

26. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998:315.

27. Harrell BL, Rudolph AH. Kelp diet: A cause of acneiform eruption. Arch Dermatol 1976;112:560 [letter].

28. Okamura K, Inoue K, Omae T. A case of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis with thyroid immunological abnormality manifested after habitual ingestion of seaweed. Acta Endocrinol 1978;88:703–12.

29. Kim JY, Kim KR. Dietary iodine intake and urinary iodine excretion in patients with thyroid diseases. Yonsei Med J 41:22–8.

30. Walkiw O, Douglas DE. Health food supplements prepared from kelp–a source of elevated urinary arsenic. Can Med Assoc J 1974;111:1301–2 [letter].

31. Conz PA, La Greca G, Benedetti P, et al. Fucus vesiculosus: A nephrotoxic alga? Nephrol Dial Transplant 1998;13:526–7 [letter].

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES
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