Kale Booster

NEWS: This superfood is now available in the SANEStore as a convenient whole-food powder so you can more easily enjoy it in smoothies and recipes.

Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES

Kale is a dark green, leafy vegetable that is part of the cabbage family. In addition to dark green, kale is also available in a variety of other colors such as purple, white, and even pink.

Like other dark green leafy vegetables, kale is high in calcium, iron, beta carotene, and vitamin C. Kale is part of the cruciferous group of vegetables (along with cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and others), which have been studied for their cancer fighting properties. Kale is also a good source of dietary fiber and an excellent source of vitamin A (in the form of carotenoids), vitamin K, and manganese. It is a very good source of copper, tryptophan, vitamin B6, and potassium; and a good source of magnesium, vitamin E, vitamin B2, protein, vitamin B1, folate, phosphorous, and vitamin B3. Also worth noting in kale’s nutritional profile is its vitamin K content. Kale contains nearly twice the amount of vitamin K as most of its fellow cruciferous vegetables.

Kale’s special mix of glucosinolates has been the hottest area of research on this cruciferous vegetable. Kale is an especially rich source of glucosinolates, and once kale is eaten and digested, these glucosinolates can be converted by the body into cancer combating compounds.

Sound Promising?

Want to Try Adding a Convenient and Pure Powdered Form of This Whole Food to Your Smoothies and Recipes?

Why Try?

  • Supporting healthy cholesterol levels
  • Source of powerful Antioxidant
  • Improving digestion & stomach health
  • Supporting the body’s detoxification system
  • Combating internal inflammation
  • Supporting healthy cardiovascular system
  • Containing 45 different flavonoids
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com
Starvation Is NOT Healthy. Stop counting calories & go #SANE w/me at http://SANESolution.com

References

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Learn the exact foods you must eat if you want to finally lose weight permanently. Click here to download your free Weight Loss Food List, the “Eat More, Lose More” Weight Loss Plan, and the “Slim in 6” Cheat Sheet…CLICK HERE FOR FREE “HOW TO” WEIGHT LOSS GUIDES
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